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Thursday, April 20

  1. page Sheltered Garden edited ... I have had enough. (angered, irritated by sheltered gardens) I gasp for breath. (speaker feel…
    ...
    I have had enough. (angered, irritated by sheltered gardens)
    I gasp for breath. (speaker feels constrained, suppressed, just like the plants"
    I want to get my dick sucked.
    Every way ends, every road,
    every foot-path leads at last
    (view changes)
  2. page Sheltered Garden edited ... I have had enough. (angered, irritated by sheltered gardens) I gasp for breath. (speaker feel…
    ...
    I have had enough. (angered, irritated by sheltered gardens)
    I gasp for breath. (speaker feels constrained, suppressed, just like the plants"
    I want to get my dick sucked.
    Every way ends, every road,
    every foot-path leads at last
    ...
    -she is a liberal mindset, as she is not afraid to voice her opinion and opposition toward the use of the "sheltered garden"
    -she does not seem to have a progressive outlook, as sheltered gardens are meant to ensure that plants are protected, and the best product is obtained. However, it seems that the speaker wishes for the plants to be left the way they are, without any improvements or intervention by man

    (view changes)

Friday, July 1

  1. page home edited ... -he is part of the "nation's backbone", as the middle class is what drives the natio…
    ...
    -he is part of the "nation's backbone", as the middle class is what drives the nation forward, ironically, he feels that though the whole entity of the "middle class" is recognized, he himself, is not being appreciated or seen by others
    -easily contented with his lot, "the easily-fed"
    -he- He also is the crux or rather symbolism of the average middle class worker because he seems to morph into everyone and everything eg. "the man who was the colour of the carriage" and the "man you looked through like a windowpane"
    -he
    feels that
    ...
    and voices"
    (view changes)

Monday, July 26

  1. page iAmUberPro edited The Man In The Bowler Hat by A.S.J. Tessimond I am the unnoticed, the unnoticable man: The man …
    The Man In The Bowler Hat
    by A.S.J. Tessimond
    I am the unnoticed, the unnoticable man:
    The man who sat on your right in the morning train:
    The man who looked through like a windowpane:
    The man who was the colour of the carriage, the colour of the mounting
    Morning pipe smoke.
    I am the man too busy with a living to live,
    Too hurried and worried to see and smell and touch:
    The man who is patient too long and obeys too much
    And wishes too softly and seldom.
    I am the man they call the nation's backbone,
    Who am boneless - playable castgut, pliable clay:
    The Man they label Little lest one day
    I dare to grow.
    I am the rails on which the moment passes,
    The megaphone for many words and voices:
    I am the graph diagram,
    Composite face.
    I am the led, the easily-fed,
    The tool, the not-quite-fool,
    The would-be-safe-and-sound,
    The uncomplaining, bound,
    The dust fine-ground,
    Stone-for-a-statue waveworn pebble-round
    The man in the bowler hat
    The speaker of this poem is a working class Caucasian male, probably about 20-40 years of age. He has some education as he wears a bowler hat usually worn by lower to middle class citizens. He is the symbol of the average worker in the 1920s, a prime example of how our jobs and society shapes and molds us into conformists, all too afraid to strike out into the world and unleash our own personal potentials.
    He is portrayed as the kind of person whom you could walk past and not even take note of or gain an impression of. This is shown by “the unnoticeable man” as well as the subsequent 3 lines enforcing the point that he could be someone you pass by everyday but not even notice.
    His morality and psychology is that of someone who not a risk-taker and afraid of stepping out of his supposed comfort zone of mundane daily activities. This is shown by “patient too long and obeys too much” and “wishes too softly and seldom”.
    He has the maturity, knowledge and mindset that understand the mistakes he is committing as well as the flaws in his character. This is shown by “too busy with a living to live”, “Too hurried and worried to see and smell and touch” and “am boneless”.
    He also knows the role he plays in society as well as the limitations society places on him. This is shown by “nation’s backbone” and “label Little lest one day I dare to grow”.
    Lastly, he knows that he is merely a tool that will do whatever the higher-ups want him to do without receiving the majority of the credit. This is shown by “megaphone for many words and voices” and the entire last stanza, especially “stone-for-a-statue waveworn pebble-round”.

    (view changes)
    7:07 am
  2. page Sheltered Garden edited ... This poem shows that man's actions, which help to protect the plants, inevitably causes them t…
    ...
    This poem shows that man's actions, which help to protect the plants, inevitably causes them to be constrained, and not be able to reach that natural level of growth and beauty.
    The speaker is clearly concerned, and to some extent, angered, by this limitation of growth, as she says "I have had enough". The speaker feels that the "sheltered garden", is overly protected, and influenced by man, and there is "no taste of bark, or coarse weeds". The speaker clearly wishes for the gardens to be cared for, but not to the extent that there is a loss of natural flavour and liveliness. The speaker is likely to be a knowledgeable person, or could also be a middle aged to elderly person, as she seems to like the rawness and wildness of nature, instead of the artificially protected "sheltered garden".
    The speaker
    -concerned about nature, "no scent of resin in this place", feels that Sheltered Garden has prevented plants from achieving their natural state of growth
    -intelligent, she observes the irony of plants being over-treated and sheltered, to the point that they are "smothered in straw" and are suffocated
    -stands up for herself, not afraid to voice her opinion of plants and how they should be treated
    -straight road, no adventure or freedom in nature, prefers nature to be in its untamed state, appreciates the wildness of nature
    -frustrated as she is not given the chance to witness the plants in their natural state, "no taste of bark, or coarse weeds"
    -does not like artificial or modified plants, feels that man is interfering too much with nature, could be seen to be a slightly old-fashioned person
    -she is a liberal mindset, as she is not afraid to voice her opinion and opposition toward the use of the "sheltered garden"
    -she does not seem to have a progressive outlook, as sheltered gardens are meant to ensure that plants are protected, and the best product is obtained. However, it seems that the speaker wishes for the plants to be left the way they are, without any improvements or intervention by man

    (view changes)
  3. page Nativity Play edited ... The situation or setting, is that the speaker is involved in a play which centres round christ…
    ...
    The situation or setting, is that the speaker is involved in a play which centres round christian beliefs, and ironically, she does not even believe in angels in the first place, and thinks that they are just to "populate heaven".
    The term "Nativity", refers to the story of the birth of Jesus, and from the title, "Nativity Play", the writer, Tilla Brading, gives the reader the impression that the story would revolve around some form of religious beliefs, most likely about the Christian faith.
    The Speaker
    -young and immature girl
    -skeptical about angels, practical mindset, (I don's believe in angels)
    -cynical of the costume of angel
    -laissez-faire attitude as she accepts to play the angel in the play, "to get off games"
    -sarcastic, "too much earthly weight to rise off the ground"
    -self-centered, disrespectful, refuses to accept religious icons, like the angel, to be real, and makes fun of them as a fantasy
    -little respect toward religious icons
    -unenthusiastic, did not join the play for the experience of reenacting, the Nativity (Jesus's birth), instead, she simply uses it as an excuse to avoid something she does not like
    -rational mentality, does not readily believe in angels
    -weak spirituality, although it is not revealed whether she was a Christian or not

    (view changes)
  4. page home edited Welcome to Your New Wiki! Getting Started Click on the edit button above to put your own conte…

    Welcome to Your New Wiki!
    Getting Started
    Click on the edit button above to put your own content on this page.
    To invite new members, click on Manage Wiki and Invite People.
    To change your wiki's colors or theme, click on Manage Wiki and Look and Feel.
    To set who can view and edit your wiki, click on Manage Wiki and Permissions.
    Need Help?
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    The Man in the Bowler Hat
    I am the unnoticed, the unnoticable man: (insignificant, blends in with the crowd)
    ...
    (Put random stuff here)
    The Man in the Bowler Hat, is a poem written by A.S.J. Tessimond. It revolves around a "The Man In The Bowler Hat", who symbolizes the average Englishman, who is part of the working class. The poem discusses themes such as the loss of individuality, as a result of economic development. The poem also goes into a detailed showing of the "man in the bowler hat", and his constant lack of prominence and fame. The man in the poem is portrayed as one whose identity lies solely in his job, while the rest of his whole is meaningless. Stripped off anythig resembling his personality, he merely blends in with the cold, heartless crowd who shares his mundane life. The man in the bowler hat lives to work, as well as works to live. His inability to stand up for himself or express his inner feelings are a result of his daily job, as he is always on the move. He is the 'unnoticeable man', showing that modernized society has no care or concern for him. Despite being praised by newspapers or given bonuses by the government, the man does not psossess the most important thing: his life. Perhaps, the poem conveys a hidden message against the modern industrialised society as being the catalyst for destroying the happinness and meaning of life due to the hard work and labor that is carried out.
    ...
    to live".
    The Speaker
    -emotionally mature and knowledgeable
    -forced to work hard to survive, no time to appreciate life's wonders, "too busy with a living to live"
    -part of a almost homogeneous working class, "unnoticed man", does not get social recognition and merely blends with the crowd
    -forlorn, feels lonely. The irony is that he is part of the large middle class, with many people, and yet, he feels lonely as he has no one important in his life, other than his work, "looked through like a windowpane
    -he feels a sense of oppression, as he "obeys too much" and is "boneless" and he feels that he is like "playable castgut"
    -he is part of the "nation's backbone", as the middle class is what drives the nation forward, ironically, he feels that though the whole entity of the "middle class" is recognized, he himself, is not being appreciated or seen by others
    -easily contented with his lot, "the easily-fed"
    -he feels that he is being used by society, as he is "the tool" and "the megaphone for many words and voices"

    (view changes)

Thursday, July 22

  1. page Sheltered Garden edited ... The Sheltered Garden, is written by Hilda Dolittle or H.D. It revolves around the "shelte…
    ...
    The Sheltered Garden, is written by Hilda Dolittle or H.D. It revolves around the "sheltered garden", and how this shelter, which is meant to protect the garden, and prevent the plants from being harmed or damaged in some way. However, this ironically, hinders the garden's growth, and prevents it from achieving maximum, natural beauty. The phrase "fruit under cover - that wanted light". The fruits are "under cover" and "smothered", showing that they are overly protected, and are suffocated.
    This poem shows that man's actions, which help to protect the plants, inevitably causes them to be constrained, and not be able to reach that natural level of growth and beauty.
    ...
    and liveliness. The speaker is likely to be a knowledgeable person, or could also be a middle aged to elderly person, as she seems to like the rawness and wildness of nature, instead of the artificially protected "sheltered garden".
    (view changes)
    4:07 am
  2. page home edited ... Need Help? Click on the help link above to learn more about how to use your wiki. The Man i…
    ...
    Need Help?
    Click on the help link above to learn more about how to use your wiki.
    The Man in the Bowler Hat
    Discussion
    (Put random stuff here)
    The Man in the Bowler Hat, is a poem written by A.S.J. Tessimond. It revolves around a "The Man In The Bowler Hat", who symbolizes the average Englishman, who is part of the working class. The poem discusses themes such as the loss of individuality, as a result of economic development. The poem also goes into a detailed showing of the "man in the bowler hat", and his constant lack of prominence and fame. The man in the poem is portrayed as one whose identity lies solely in his job, while the rest of his whole is meaningless. Stripped off anythig resembling his personality, he merely blends in with the cold, heartless crowd who shares his mundane life. The man in the bowler hat lives to work, as well as works to live. His inability to stand up for himself or express his inner feelings are a result of his daily job, as he is always on the move. He is the 'unnoticeable man', showing that modernized society has no care or concern for him. Despite being praised by newspapers or given bonuses by the government, the man does not psossess the most important thing: his life. Perhaps, the poem conveys a hidden message against the modern industrialised society as being the catalyst for destroying the happinness and meaning of life due to the hard work and labor that is carried out.
    The central conflict is both internal and external, as he thinks about how he is part of a large, cold middle class, and has to suffer a loss of individuality as he is "unnoticed". He is no having any economic problems or financial constrains, but is also not a wealthy person, and is :too busy with a living to live".

    The Man in the Bowler Hat
    I am the unnoticed, the unnoticable man: (insignificant, blends in with the crowd)
    ...
    The dust fine-ground,
    Stone-for-a-statue waveworn pebble-round
    The Man in the Bowler Hat
    Discussion
    (Put random stuff here)
    The Man in the Bowler Hat, is a poem written by A.S.J. Tessimond. It revolves around a "The Man In The Bowler Hat", who symbolizes the average Englishman, who is part of the working class. The poem discusses themes such as the loss of individuality, as a result of economic development. The poem also goes into a detailed showing of the "man in the bowler hat", and his constant lack of prominence and fame. The man in the poem is portrayed as one whose identity lies solely in his job, while the rest of his whole is meaningless. Stripped off anythig resembling his personality, he merely blends in with the cold, heartless crowd who shares his mundane life. The man in the bowler hat lives to work, as well as works to live. His inability to stand up for himself or express his inner feelings are a result of his daily job, as he is always on the move. He is the 'unnoticeable man', showing that modernized society has no care or concern for him. Despite being praised by newspapers or given bonuses by the government, the man does not psossess the most important thing: his life. Perhaps, the poem conveys a hidden message against the modern industrialised society as being the catalyst for destroying the happinness and meaning of life due to the hard work and labor that is carried out.
    The central conflict is both internal and external, as he thinks about how he is part of a large, cold middle class, and has to suffer a loss of individuality as he is "unnoticed". He is no having any economic problems or financial constrains, but is also not a wealthy person, and is "too busy with a living to live".

    (view changes)
    4:05 am

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